When Mountains Crumble


In early August, while I was in central Sierra Leone spending time with our project teams there, a continuous heavy rainfall led to a series of landslips & mudslides on a few faces of a mountain just above downtown Freetown, the capital, which is on the central west coast of the nation. This massive displacement of earth then added a huge surge to already flooding streams and destroyed homes, communities and families downstream to the coast. I’ve been slow and reluctant to post these photos, because there was such media coverage, and I don’t want to pile on or seem ghoulish. Since I’ve spent the past four months watching the impact of a major natural disaster in my immediate home area, I feel doubly sensitive to this. But at the same I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about the impacts and effects of such events in a wealthy and well-resourced place, like the US — versus the impact of such natural disasters in countries which struggle with basics even in best times. I also wonder when our global community of humanity will establish more sustainable and fair global economies – too many countries I’ve worked in recently will be extra-heavily hit as global warming raises sea levels further — island nations which may vanish entirely due to blind over-consumption in the richest nations like…well, like mine.

What Freetown had to deal with was far worse than what we’ve had to deal with here – much more loss of life, and the destruction was so fast and complete in the affected areas. And of course California (let alone the US) has a lot of resources and expertise to rely back on. Sierra Leone (population less than 1/3 of California and economy even smaller by proportion) has had to deal with more than its fair share of hard luck in recent years. I found that folks responded strongly yet again, and did what they could. I was glad to be there and able to help provide some immediate support, even though most of our work is with maternal-child health in areas other than Freetown. I won’t say more – there was plenty of public coverage at the time; this is my own salute to the folks I worked with and this warm country that has had to deal with so much in recent decades.

3 responses

  1. Tamara

    Paul, next time be sure to pack some paper towels so you can help more effectively. :-S In sincerity, I feel like you can be our feet on the ground and that I can help a little, vicariously, by knowing you are there. We need to be reminded, even beaten over the head, with the real effects of our greed and disregard for the earth. Thanks for sharing.

    February 11, 2018 at 07:30

  2. What a difficult situation that was for this small, poor country. Let’s hope things go better for them going forward! And Paul, good luck as you head to Africa again on a new mission!

    February 11, 2018 at 07:54

  3. It does take my breath away and feelings of helplessness, except to know that you and your team are there…helping, consoling, thinking through to possible solutions – however small they might be.

    February 12, 2018 at 07:27

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